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How To Participate In Stop The Bleed

It’s time to educate the public

Stop The Bleed is an initiative by the American College of Surgeons and Hartford Consensus to educate the public on bleeding control and to make bleeding control kits readily available for public access in the event of an emergency.

Life threatening bleeding can happen at any moment:

  • Home Injuries
  • Work-Related Injuries
  • Motor Vehicle Crashes
  • Mass Casualty Incidents
  • Active Shooter Events
  • Bombings

As nurses, we need to support this lifesaving initiative. Someone with life threatening bleeding can die in minutes. We need to make sure the public is trained in the event of an emergency so they have the knowledge to save someones life while first responders arrive to the scene.

We can assist by doing the following:

1. Become a bleeding control instructor

In order to become a trainer, you must first attend a Bleeding Control class. I’ve inserted a link below where you may search for a class in your area. If there is nothing listed in your area, contact your local fire station or EMS agency and they should be able to assist you.

cms.bleedingcontrol.org/class/search 

2. Teach a bleeding control class in your community

As nurses, we are the largest group of healthcare professionals. If we all became instructors and taught classes, we would be able to educate most, if not all of the public.

3. Encourage installation of bleeding control kits in public areas

The Hartford Consensus recommends bleeding control kits to be installed in malls, airports, hospitals, schools, theaters, etc. We should encourage and collaborate with our healthcare organization or hospital to set an example in the community by installing these kits. You can find more information on: www.bleedingcontrol.org 

References:

www.bleedingcontrol.org

www.bulletin.facs.org/2015/07/the-hartford-consensus-iii-implementation-of-bleeding-control

Written by Nurse Blake

Blake is a registered nurse and received his BSN from the University of Central Florida. He has worked in a number of healthcare roles throughout his career and has managed several injury prevention programs and started Banned4Life, which ended an outdated FDA blood donor policy. Today, Blake is an advocate for nurses and patients and encourages a healthy work environment. He is a writer, public speaker, and has been a paid contributor to the New York Times.

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