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5 Items Every Nurse Should Have

These are the basics

1. Stethoscope

We should all be proud of our stethoscope, especially after Joy Behar from The View asked, “Why does she have a doctor’s stethoscope?”, referring to the Miss America Contestant, Nurse Kelly Johnson who was performing a monologue wearing her scrubs and stethoscope. Regardless of what Joy Behar thinks, we should always be prepared to assess our patients for any sudden cardiac or respiratory changes.

2. Comfortable Shoes

Walking and/or running on our feet for 12 or more hours is not comfortable when lacking appropriate footwear. Spend time and money finding a pair of shoes that make your feet feel like they are sleeping on a Serta mattress.

3. Shears

Just have them! I’ve lost numerous pairs of shears throughout the years, especially the blue pair that I purchased for myself in nursing school (If found, please return. Thanks!). These can come in handy when removing clothing or cutting gauze.

4. Penlight

Neurological changes can happen at any moment, we must be ready to assess our patients in a timely manner. If you don’t have a penlight, the other nurses on your unit probably don’t have one either, so who are you going to borrow from?

5. Multiple writing utensils

Guess who looses more writing utensils than restaurant servers? Nurses! It is guaranteed that you will loose your favorite pen either in a room with contact precautions or it will fall out of your top pocket while you are changing bedsheets right down on a soiled chuck. Fortunately, you have your second favorite pen but it will be “borrowed” from another nurse on your unit that will then be “loaned” out to another nurse. In order to keep your sanity, just buy 100 of your favorite pens or pencils next time you are at Target.

Written by Nurse Blake

Blake is a registered nurse and received his BSN from the University of Central Florida. He has worked in a number of healthcare roles throughout his career and has managed several injury prevention programs and started Banned4Life, which ended an outdated FDA blood donor policy. Today, Blake is an advocate for nurses and patients and encourages a healthy work environment. He is a writer, public speaker, and has been a paid contributor to the New York Times.

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