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Tips To Be Successful In Nursing School

Don’t worry, it will be over before you know it

 1. Embrace the experience

Nursing school is just a small part of your nursing journey. Even though it may seem like it will take forever to graduate, you will be walking across that stage before you know it. And then, all you will be focused on is not tripping and falling on your face!

 2. Attend all classes and turn in assignments on time

Even though it may be a beautiful day outside and you are tempted to lay by the pool, please just attend class. You are paying for the class, why not go? That would be like ordering a Starbucks and then just leaving it on the counter for someone else to claim. Also, turn your assignments in on time. Part of nursing school is showing that you can be responsible. Doing both of these things will keep you on track and will prevent you from falling behind.

3. Stay organized and prioritize

You are probably staying organized if the inside of your planner looks like a chaotic rainbow. If you are not organized, go out and buy multi-colored pens, highlighters, markers, and post-it notes. Spend some time on creating a routine that you will be able to follow on a daily basis so that you can get into a habit. To prioritize, make a list of your assignments and exams by due date and percentage of your overall class grade. Then, start working to check them off.

4. Study with the smartest student or find a study group

Studying with others will help you review all the information and gain different perspectives from your peers. Quiz each other over and over again. If you don’t see an increase in your grade, find another study group and do what works best for you.

5. Join and participate in your nursing student association

Nursing school is not just about making the grade, it is also about being involved and participating in professional associations. If you think employers just look at grades before hiring, you are wrong. Employers want to know what kind of impact you are making in your community and if you dedicate part of your time to professional development.

6. Remember, there is more to life than school

While school should be one of your top priorities be sure to make room for your friends, family, and YOURSELF! It is possible to balance all of these things as long as you stay focused and ahead of the game.

Written by Nurse Blake

Blake is a registered nurse and received his BSN from the University of Central Florida. He has worked in a number of healthcare roles throughout his career and has managed several injury prevention programs and started Banned4Life, which ended an outdated FDA blood donor policy. Today, Blake is an advocate for nurses and patients and encourages a healthy work environment. He is a writer, public speaker, and has been a paid contributor to the New York Times.

4 Comments

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  1. I am so proud. I want to be just like you when I grow up. Almost 26 and you are still that same great grandson. Love Always Your Nan.

  2. I was pleasantly surprised to see a nursing class so big! I’d be lost! I graduated in 1983(yeah,I know, I’m an old fogey rn,& proud!) Not long ago, a new rn asked if I’d known Florence N.!! Haha, she was joking….I think! Anyway, I started school at a large University w a class size similar( Michigan State) but quickly realized,Ed class too big for me and quickly transferred to a smaller school. We started w 102 students, graduated 32! Since student to instructor ratio so small, never more than 4:1, we HAD to know our stuff! No where to slither in your chair! And tons of clinical time. We had.clinicals 7days/wk at times. But I still loved my time in nsg school! I had always, since birth knew I’d be an RN w really sick pts. I stuck to it and done most of career in trauma and open heart/transplant Wouldn’t change for the world! Sorry to write so much! First time I’ve ever responded to anything! Good job w your site, Blake!

    • Hello Sally! Thanks so much for checking out the site and taking the time to comment. I really appreciate it! WOW, crazy your class started with 102 students and only graduated with 32. Must have been a demanding program! I’ve also worked as a nurse in trauma and transplants (specialized in liver though). I’m happy that you found your passion in nursing because there are so many different avenues. Thanks again for the comment! Have a great shift. -Nurse Blake

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